Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA

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oren.elkaim.student
Kudos: 31
Joined: Sep 17, 2017
Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
17 Sep 2017
Hey I'm trying to get as much info as I can as to how to finally get started with Online Arbitrage. I've been researching for countless hours and still haven't been able to source my own product. I know how to identify one and I just don't seem to able to find my own.

A couple questions that, when answered could be a help me out:

Is it even possible to source without online paid product lists? If so, tips and tricks would be appreciated

Is it just more worth it to use the lists?

Where is the best place to get a good list for a reasonable price?

If your answers help me find an item, and I end up getting one, should I ship it to my house or directly to amazon?

Does having FBA really make all the difference?

And anything else you're willing to add

Thanks so much,

[Last edited: 19 Sep 2017]
Chicago, Illinois United States
c.wooters
Kudos: 97
Joined: Sep 6, 2017
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
18 Sep 2017
@oren.elkaim.student

Never heard of the acronym OA. But if the question is how to find suppliers without a supplier list, then I would recommend Thomas.net as a B2B directory of manufacturers and vendors.

As for me, I ship the very first order to my storage. That gives you an opportunity to inspect the product and packaging for quality. It also depends on the product. I import goods bulk and have them delivered to a local packaging company. They also do quality checks. It costs a little extra but I consider it valuable. Poor online reviews will kill your sales. If enough customers receive damaged goods your ratings will reflect it.

IMHO FBA is a good value. The FBA fees in my case are almost the same as shipping & handling costs from fulfilling the product myself.
Canada Canada
oren.elkaim.student
Kudos: 31
Joined: Sep 17, 2017
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
19 Sep 2017
@c.wooters Thank you, however this doesn't seem to answer my question.
OA stand for online arbitrage

[Last edited: 19 Sep 2017]
Chicago, Illinois United States
c.wooters
Kudos: 97
Joined: Sep 6, 2017
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
20 Sep 2017
@oren.elkaim.student

Hmmm...I looked up OA and it seems like a loser to me...a lot of effort for narrow margins. IMHO YMMV
Canada Canada
oren.elkaim.student
Kudos: 31
Joined: Sep 17, 2017
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
21 Sep 2017
@c.wooters

What would you suggest
Nottingham United Kingdom
Bigian13
Kudos: 3,095
Joined: Feb 21, 2014
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
21 Sep 2017
OA used to be an easy and profitable way of doing business, but in my opinion is now getting harder to make money at. Years ago, sellers tended to stick to one marketplace to do business. Now with inventory control software it is easier to share inventory across multiple international marketplaces therefore sellers are selling on more channels. There is still the odd mismatch that can be exploited but you need dedicated software or a lot of time and patience to exploit this. There are also more and more people trying OA and dropshipping so the market will get saturated and prices will drop due to competition

There are a number of sites that can provide lists for you, but with constantly changing stock and prices, and more people using them it is a bit of a risk in my opinion. Even though there are often lots of glowing reviews !!

There would not be many sellers that would be able to or be prepared to ship direct to Amazon on your behalf due to the labels and paperwork required to ship to an Amazon fulfillment centre. If you had them shipped to you, you can check the quality and then ship to Amazon, but then you have an additional cost and therefore less profit.

Dropshipping may be an idea, especially if you source from international markets such as the UK and get them to ship to Canada, especially while the exchange rate is favourable.

Whatever you do, good luck.
E-commerce , love it or hate it, that's why we are here
Nottingham United Kingdom
Bigian13
Kudos: 3,095
Joined: Feb 21, 2014
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
21 Sep 2017
@c.wooters

Thomas.net ???
E-commerce , love it or hate it, that's why we are here
Canada Canada
oren.elkaim.student
Kudos: 31
Joined: Sep 17, 2017
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
22 Sep 2017
@Bigian13

Very Helpful, thanks so much
Herts, England - Not specified -
Andy
Kudos: 12,387
Joined: Jan 1, 2001
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
22 Sep 2017

Bigian13 wrote:

@c.wooters

Thomas.net ???
www.thomasnet.com/

That's the one he means. Actually an awful domain name, but they were founded in 1898 so let's forgive them!

[Last edited: 22 Sep 2017]
Andy Geldman, Web Retailer
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Denver, Colorado United States
Jason Lancaster
Kudos: 52
Joined: Oct 3, 2017
Re: Young. Looking for advice on getting started with OA
3 Oct 2017
I don't know that it's a great niche (there's a lot of competition), but you might consider selling after-market auto accessories online. I say this because:

1. If you pick a really specific niche, produce a bit of content related to that niche, and then do a modicum of marketing on social media (join a few FB groups and forums), you'll be able to grow your site pretty quickly. Every type of vehicle has a dedicated fan base, and there are parts and accessories specific to these cars that aren't available elsewhere.

2. Most part manufacturers have a MAP policy that protects a 30% gross margin (give or take), and enforcement is pretty good across the board. If you can get people to your site and convince them to buy, you can start earning a few thousand a month pretty quickly.

3. As you develop wholesale accounts and relationships, you can start selling at scale on Amazon, eBay, etc. The margins are tiny when it's all said and done (2-4%), but the revenues are awesome.

I talk to a lot of people doing this very thing, and while I don't know many that have made a million dollars, most people are able to pay themselves a decent salary doing all of the above.

Of course, having said all of this, the competition gets stiffer every day, and the accessories business is very much dependent upon the auto sales market...if we have another 2008 or 2009, it could get ugly.

Still, if you're looking for ideas, it might be worth researching.
Jason Lancaster
President
Spork Marketing

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