Marketing Roundup: Social Media, PPC, Conversion and More

Marketing roundup

Many of the demands of marketplace selling are technical and process-driven: rules, systems, and software automation. It’s geeky stuff.

Marketing, on the other hand, takes skills in creativity, salesmanship and psychology. It’s a different world.

Or so you may think.

There is a need for all that in marketing, but it’s not all about creativity and intuition. Like anything else, marketing skills can be learned. And a lot of online marketing is actually very technical.

So here’s a roundup of our past posts on marketing: eBay optimization, Amazon advertising, social media, PPC and more. Geek or not, I hope you find it useful! Continue reading

8 Unconventional Ways to Build Links to Your Online Store

Build links to your online store

This post is by Edward Dennis, digital marketing lead at agency Core dna. It was first published on the Sellbrite blog as 8 Unconventional Ways to Build Backlinks to Your eCommerce Store. Link building is a key SEO strategy for improving organic search rankings and traffic.

We’ve all been there.

We sit down with a warm cup of coffee in one hand and a long list of link-building tactics in the other. Somewhere in that list is the magical answer to building backlinks to your business site. However, have you ever noticed a pattern in these lists?

Not only do they never focus on multi-product ecommerce sites, but the advice and tactics they offer are either outdated or beaten to death by your competitors. “Publish amazing content, mention brands on social media, fix broken links.” All things you’re likely already doing.

What if I told you there was a way to build thousands of backlinks without using any of these tired old tactics?

In this post, I’m going to show you eight such unconventional tactics to build backlinks to your ecommerce store.

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Shipping Private Label Products from China: My Nightmare Story

Man facing tsunami

This post is by Danny McMillan, a private label seller and international speaker on selling through the Amazon marketplace. Danny is a music industry survivor and serial start-up entrepreneur, focusing on Amazon FBA for the last two years. As a public speaker, he has appeared at events including the Smart China Sourcing Summit, Private Label World Summit and the European Private Label Summit. He can be found at DannyMcMillan.com.

I’ve been private labeling for a couple of years now: sourcing products from China, creating a brand and selling them through Amazon FBA. I haven’t nailed it by any stretch of the imagination, but I’ve been through the sea-shipping process six times, gained some amazing experiences and learned a lot of lessons along the way.

Back in May I wrote about my first visit to China and the Canton Fair. Trade shows are a fantastic way to scout for new products and meet suppliers face-to-face. Not long after, I decided to embark on a new product launch with my supplier. I worked through product selection, branding and manufacturing without too much trouble. One task remained: shipping the finished products over from China in time for Christmas. It’s just moving something from A to B. Should be simple, right?

Wrong. It turned out to be the most difficult and unpredictable experience of my private labeling career so far. Murphy’s law tells us that everything that can go wrong will go wrong. And it did. I was asked for paperwork that I hadn’t needed before. As soon as I had jumped through that hoop, I was asked for more documents. That happened again and again. Then the payment to my supplier went through early, before the products had even been inspected. After that, we had hazardous material issues with the shipment. Then the boxes were damaged on the way to the port in China. Any one of those problems would be enough to lose sleep over.

But Murphy’s law was wrong. Not only did everything that could go wrong go wrong, things that can’t go wrong went wrong too. My shipment ended up slap-bang in the middle of the biggest economic disaster to hit the freight industry in the last 100 years: the bankruptcy of the world’s seventh-largest shipping company. It was completely unprecedented, and nobody had a clue what was going on. Would my products ever see the light of day?

So here it is: my nightmare story of getting one shipment over from China. I’ll be candid about what happened, and tell you everything I learned. I hope it helps you avoid the same problems.

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Selling Internationally: A Guide to Tools & Services for Cross-Border Trade

Selling internationally

Cross-border selling through Amazon, eBay and other marketplaces has a lot going for it. Just flip a switch and your inventory becomes available to hundreds of millions of international customers, almost instantly. Well, that’s the theory anyway.

In practice, it doesn’t tend to be that simple. Yes, you are selling the same inventory so there’s no additional effort for sourcing and managing stock (other than needing to do it on a larger scale). But just about everything else has an additional layer of complexity when you are selling internationally.

Fortunately, cross-border trade is booming, and many new international ecommerce services and suppliers have emerged, all geared up to help sellers trade successfully across borders. In this post I’ll explain who those suppliers are, what they do, and how to choose the right one for you.

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The Power of Marketplaces in a Trump-Brexit World

Smashing a wall

This post is by Alex Ogilvie, Managing Director of Seller Dynamics. Seller Dynamics is a multichannel management system, listing stock on marketplaces including Amazon, eBay, Rakuten and Fnac. It also features an automatic repricer, handles shipping and generates purchase orders for suppliers.

Few would have predicted a year ago that Donald Trump and Nigel Farage would be posing together for a thumbs-up photo on the top floor of Trump Tower in New York last weekend.

Both have views that would see the world order change when it comes to international trade. Leaving the EU creates a set of challenges that Theresa May’s UK cabinet are clearly finding difficult to find a clear, unified position on. While the stated intent from the Trump campaign is to draw to an end certain US trade deals that he and his team see as simply too generous.

What will this mean for marketplace sellers, particularly those selling internationally?

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