How to Drive External Traffic to Your Listings Using Influencer Marketing

Alex Knight talks to Katie Palmer of etailz about the most effective way to generate external traffic and sales: working with “influencers”

We often hear from sellers who want to drive visitors to their Amazon, eBay or Etsy listings from outside those marketplaces – known as “external traffic”. Competition is fierce on the marketplaces, so if you can bring in buyers from elsewhere that really helps lift your products above the fighting on price, reviews and PPC advertising.

So far so good, in principle. But sellers struggle to find good, practical advice about using social media to drive traffic to their listings. They get bombarded with information about starting social pages and growing a following, but for many sellers it just doesn’t go anywhere. A lot of valuable time goes into it and they get very little reward.

How can sellers really leverage social media? The usual superficial advice to “use hashtags”, “post your listings on twitter” and “build a following” is of little help. Instead, for most sellers, the best way to gain significant traffic and sales isn’t from their own social accounts at all – it’s from working with people who already have a large following of their own: “influencers”.

Influencers are people who have a large blog readership or social media following (often both) within a particular niche such as nutrition or technology. They might write a blog post featuring your product, post a picture of them using or wearing it, or give out an exclusive code providing a discount to their followers. The overall aim is to get the word out about your brand to a large, but targeted, group of people who may then go and buy one of your products.

We spoke to Katie Palmer, the resident influencer marketing expert at etailz, a leading online retailer and service provider, to find out how to be successful with influencer marketing.
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Should I Expand to Amazon USA or Other European Marketplaces?

Matthew Ferguson advises Loris to put the Caesar mentality of world domination on hold and focus on conquering local marketplaces first

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

I live in Italy and am currently selling on the five European Amazon marketplaces, but I want to expand further, to reach my goal of selling on all the markets served by Amazon. I think my next move should be to sell on Amazon in the U.S., because I think customers there are more used to buying products online than they are in Europe. I currently fulfill all of my orders using FBA and I would like to continue doing this for whichever marketplace I expand on to next.

My question is whether you think expanding to Amazon in the U.S. should be my next step, or if there is anything more I can be doing in Europe?

– Loris B., Italy

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I’m Bringing a New Brand to the US. What’s the Best Approach?

Matthew Ferguson helps another reader avoid the rough and stay on the fairway, this time with a plan to import high-end golf shoes from Italy

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

My business partner has a best friend in Italy who makes high-end golf shoes using top-notch materials. This golf shoe is already selling well in Italy’s retail stores, for between €300 and €450. We want to help him sell his golf shoes in the U.S. through Amazon and eBay. The wholesale price for these shoes is about $120 dollars. I checked other branded golf shoes on Amazon and the price ranges from $120-$190.

I have been an Amazon FBA seller for almost two years now, but I still consider myself to be new. So, I’d like to know whether this would be a good move financially, and if I should test the market online first. Also, is it unreasonable to have the golf shoe maker sign an exclusive contract with my company?

— Jean-Paul B., New Jersey

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Retail Global 2017: Learn, Network and Get Involved in Las Vegas this September

Escape the confines of your office, hear from experts and network with fellow retailers – there’s no better way to grow your ecommerce IQ

When you have an online business it’s easy to spend all day staring at a computer screen, devoid of real human contact, especially if you work alone. You know there’s events out there, but attending is a big step when you have a growing business taking up all your time.

It does take time and effort to attend a conference, there’s no denying that. But nothing can beat learning and interacting in person. A webinar, for example, can’t replace the experience of hearing from a range of experts in a room full of like-minded people, who you have the opportunity to network with face-to-face.

Industries like blogging and cyber security, which could not be more rooted in the online world, have huge and successful conferences with tens of thousands of people attending. Conferences are just as valuable to businesses who sell through Amazon, eBay and their own online stores.

That’s where Retail Global comes in. Now in its third year, it gives sellers a chance to learn, network and interact with industry experts and fellow sellers. It provides two dedicated tracks for marketplace sellers alongside keynote speeches, panel discussions, intensive workshops and even a gala pool party.

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My Top Five Tactics for Rapid Product Testing on the Amazon Marketplace

Product selection isn’t about hitting the bullseye first time. It’s about experimentation, data and trying again. Danny McMillan explains his approach.

This post is by Danny McMillan. Danny is an international public speaker, private label seller and host of Seller Sessions the weekly advanced marketing show for Amazon sellers. Danny has been a guest speaker at The Smart China Sourcing Summit in Hong Kong, The European Private Label Summit, The Private Label World Summit and Private Label Days to name a few.

Imagine the situation: you’ve decided to sell a new private label product on Amazon. You find a supplier, agree the details, and place an order with them. You receive the units, create a great listing on Amazon, get some Sponsored Product Ads running… and then the problems start.

Your product just isn’t selling. Maybe your average cost per click is three times what you expected. Maybe your product turns out to be inferior to your competitor’s version. Or maybe there is simply no market for it and the units won’t move whatever you do.

These kind of problems are common, but can often be avoided. If you test the product and the market before committing to a big order, you can discover and fix a lot of problems, and change your approach before taking on stock. This is an organic method, based on testing a number of different factors in your chosen product category. Your results may differ if you are planning on a large scale launch with hundreds of giveaways.

There is a misconception that product testing is costly and time consuming. That doesn’t have to be the case, as you will see in this post. I’ll show you some of my favorite product testing hacks, which will help you generate rich and accurate market data, create better products more quickly, and carry out sample tests to save you a lot of money further down the line.

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