The Best Free Amazon Keyword and Product Research Tools

Alex Knight walks us through the best FREE research software Amazon sellers can use to help their sourcing and marketing efforts

Earlier this year, I did some research on the best free eBay selling tools to help me sell a rather gnarly collection of gnomes. This process made me realize just how useful free tools can be for online sellers and I was keen to provide our readers with an Amazon equivalent. So, I donned my deerstalker hat and began tracking down some useful free tools for Amazon sellers.

I focused my search on tools specifically made for sellers. This excludes software like CamelCamelCamel and Keepa. While they are undoubtedly useful pricing tracking tools, they are essentially shopper-focused. Instead, I’ve included tools that provide Amazon marketplace research data, whether that’s in the form of keywords people are searching for, sales estimates or pricing advice.

All the tools included in this article are free to use. By this, I don’t mean that they offer a free trial for a few days, and then make you spend your hard-earned bucks. These tools all have “free forever” versions where you can access the same features, day after day, without ever being asked to pay.

For each tool I’ve identified what it does, how it works and why you might want to use it. There is also a walkthrough video so you can see each tool in action.

Continue reading

The Truth About Backend Keyword Search Indexing on Amazon

Is there really a hard limit on Amazon listing “backend” search terms? Anthony Lee has the definitive answer on limits and a lot more.

This post is by Anthony Lee, COO of SixLeaf (formerly ZonBlast), the first and largest product launch and ranking service for Amazon sellers.

If you sell on Amazon, particularly if you sell your own brands, you’ve undoubtedly been affected by the most recent change in the indexing of your listings’ search terms (commonly referred to as “hidden” or “backend” keywords).

Backend keywords are set in Seller Central, and don’t show visibly to buyers. In theory, they should lead to your product appearing in search results, just like the other words in your listing, such as those in the title and description (much more on that later).

However, there has been recent debate about how these terms are included in Amazon’s search index. How many are actually used when deciding whether your product is relevant to a customer’s search?

Anecdotes are rampant across forums and seller groups, telling tales of woe about decreasing listing views.The general consensus is that the number of search term characters that are indexed has decreased dramatically.

But there has been no official update from Amazon, or statements to explain how sellers should now optimize their keywords. Instead, there’s just a lot of the same ambiguous and inaccurate advice. To make matters worse, in typical Seller Central fashion, Amazon’s own support staff are giving out old information, or apparently just making it up as they go.

For this post, we’ve researched how Amazon really indexes backend keywords. I’ll put the record straight on a number of points, so you can make the best use of search keywords in your own listings.

Continue reading

How to Buy and Sell Websites Like a Professional Flipper

Finding, fixing and “flipping” web-based businesses can be a profitable strategy, says Victoria Duff. Here’s how the professionals do it.

This post is by Victoria Duff, a web business mergers and acquisitions broker with Latona’s LLC. Victoria works with both institutional and individual buyers and sellers of established and profitable online businesses, including ecommerce, SaaS providers and blogs.

My job, brokering web-businesses at Latona’s, means I work with a lot of website flippers. I sell them small web businesses and I broker the sale of their completed projects – hopefully, large and profitable ones.

I see a fairly even split between the number of professional flippers looking for their next projects and the inexperienced wannabes who have been lured by tales of huge profits. The number of wannabe website flippers grows yearly. Most have no practical experience in flipping of any kind and need some detailed advice – which is why I am writing this article.

Continue reading

Should I Keep My Vendor Account, When Selling on Amazon Marketplace?

Matthew Ferguson explains a couple of cunning tactics you can use with Amazon Vendor to benefit your marketplace selling account

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

Hi Matt,

I have a small company and we’ve been selling on Amazon for about a year. We have used Amazon Vendor in the past, but have now opened a Seller account.

We’ve been wondering if we still need a Vendor account since moving to FBA as a marketplace seller.

Should we be worried about damaging our product listings? Do you have any suggestions for us on what to do with these accounts, or if we need them? Which is better?

We sell boating accessories, parts and clothing mostly.

— Mike, San Francisco.

Continue reading

Wholesalers Won’t Sell to Me. How Can I Win Them Over?

Matthew Ferguson explains why wholesalers are hesitant to deal with marketplace sellers and the best ways to build relationships with them

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

I am based in the UK and have been selling on eBay for a couple of years and Amazon for six months. I sell mainly toys and children’s products but I have recently been ungated in the Health and Beauty and Personal Care categories, so I’m looking to spread my wings.

At the moment I mainly do arbitrage but I would really like to move more into wholesale. However, I find that decent wholesalers are reluctant to supply Amazon sellers.

How should I reply to an email from a wholesaler that I have approached, and would really like to work with, to try and ensure I get a favorable response?

— Mandy Williams, U.K.

Continue reading