Tag Archives: Amazon

Is Amazon Controlling My Sales? No Matter What I Do, They Stay Flat

Matthew Ferguson explains how following “the data brick road” and embracing change can prevent your Amazon sales from flatlining

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

Five years ago, we started selling kitchen products on Amazon.de. We started with about 500 SKUs and doubled this to 1,000. We then got rid of 500 SKUs that didn’t sell well, and listed new products. At the moment we are at about 800 SKUs, and always sell between 14,000 and 15,000 units a month.

We also have a top seller that sells 2,000 units every month. We had two months where we weren’t able to stock this product so didn’t sell a single unit, yet we still sold between 14,000 and 15,000 units overall those months.

If we have some weeks above average then the next few weeks are below average. We do not change prices much and we do not change our sponsored ads. This is really frustrating as we have the resources to grow, but no matter what we do, we always have the same amount of sales every month.

Do you know anything about Amazon controlling sales, to keep sellers on a certain level?

— Bernd M., Austria

Continue reading

Crazy Customers and Bad Buyers: 10 Ways They Infuriate Sellers on Amazon and eBay

Wild threats, manic changes of mind, outright lies and childish acts of spite. It’s just another day at the office for online sellers.

If you ask a marketplace seller what infuriates them, a few things might come up. For example, trying to contact Amazon’s internal teams, anti-competitive behavior from their rivals, or making sure they comply with the ever-changing rules. But none of these can touch the level of annoyance, frustration and anger caused by bad buyers.

The majority of buyers are genuine. They order from you, pay promptly, and receive their goods with no fuss. But when bad buyers come along, they leave a trail of stress in their wake. Whether they’ve threatened you with negative feedback, made a false “item not as described” claim or cancelled their order after you’ve shipped it, the end results are usually the same – time, money and stock going to waste.

We’ve seen a lot of stories in the forum and blog from exasperated sellers, and distilled them here into the top 10 ways that bad buyers infuriate online sellers.

Thank you to Web Retailer members for your frank and insightful blog comments and forum posts.

Continue reading

Should I Expand to Amazon USA or Other European Marketplaces?

Matthew Ferguson advises Loris to put the Caesar mentality of world domination on hold and focus on conquering local marketplaces first

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

I live in Italy and am currently selling on the five European Amazon marketplaces, but I want to expand further, to reach my goal of selling on all the markets served by Amazon. I think my next move should be to sell on Amazon in the U.S., because I think customers there are more used to buying products online than they are in Europe. I currently fulfill all of my orders using FBA and I would like to continue doing this for whichever marketplace I expand on to next.

My question is whether you think expanding to Amazon in the U.S. should be my next step, or if there is anything more I can be doing in Europe?

– Loris B., Italy

Continue reading

Retail Global 2017: Learn, Network and Get Involved in Las Vegas this September

Escape the confines of your office, hear from experts and network with fellow retailers – there’s no better way to grow your ecommerce IQ

When you have an online business it’s easy to spend all day staring at a computer screen, devoid of real human contact, especially if you work alone. You know there’s events out there, but attending is a big step when you have a growing business taking up all your time.

It does take time and effort to attend a conference, there’s no denying that. But nothing can beat learning and interacting in person. A webinar, for example, can’t replace the experience of hearing from a range of experts in a room full of like-minded people, who you have the opportunity to network with face-to-face.

Industries like blogging and cyber security, which could not be more rooted in the online world, have huge and successful conferences with tens of thousands of people attending. Conferences are just as valuable to businesses who sell through Amazon, eBay and their own online stores.

That’s where Retail Global comes in. Now in its third year, it gives sellers a chance to learn, network and interact with industry experts and fellow sellers. It provides two dedicated tracks for marketplace sellers alongside keynote speeches, panel discussions, intensive workshops and even a gala pool party.

Continue reading

My Top Five Tactics for Rapid Product Testing on the Amazon Marketplace

Product selection isn’t about hitting the bullseye first time. It’s about experimentation, data and trying again. Danny McMillan explains his approach.

This post is by Danny McMillan. Danny is an international public speaker, private label seller and host of Seller Sessions the weekly advanced marketing show for Amazon sellers. Danny has been a guest speaker at The Smart China Sourcing Summit in Hong Kong, The European Private Label Summit, The Private Label World Summit and Private Label Days to name a few.

Imagine the situation: you’ve decided to sell a new private label product on Amazon. You find a supplier, agree the details, and place an order with them. You receive the units, create a great listing on Amazon, get some Sponsored Product Ads running… and then the problems start.

Your product just isn’t selling. Maybe your average cost per click is three times what you expected. Maybe your product turns out to be inferior to your competitor’s version. Or maybe there is simply no market for it and the units won’t move whatever you do.

These kind of problems are common, but can often be avoided. If you test the product and the market before committing to a big order, you can discover and fix a lot of problems, and change your approach before taking on stock. This is an organic method, based on testing a number of different factors in your chosen product category. Your results may differ if you are planning on a large scale launch with hundreds of giveaways.

There is a misconception that product testing is costly and time consuming. That doesn’t have to be the case, as you will see in this post. I’ll show you some of my favorite product testing hacks, which will help you generate rich and accurate market data, create better products more quickly, and carry out sample tests to save you a lot of money further down the line.

Continue reading