Tag Archives: Sourcing

Source Your Stock From Leading U.S. Retailers With BULQ

BULQ brings the liquidation industry into the 21st century by offering a manifest guarantee, flat-rate shipping and the ability to source on the go

Historically, the liquidation industry has had two main problems. The first affected retailers, who had to send their stock through inefficient and costly liquidation channels, which resulted in returned and excess inventory going through a lot of middle-men, before it would eventually reach buyers that would resell to the consumer market.

The second affected buyers who were purchasing liquidation stock, only to find that when it arrived, the stock was completely different to what was included in the manifest (if there was a manifest). They were also left confused by the various shipping costs and were sometimes hit with hidden fees.

Enter BULQ, who is bringing a different, more modern, approach to the liquidation industry in order to solve these two problems. They work with some of the largest retailers in the United States and connect their excess and returned inventory directly with entrepreneurs who buy the stock and resell it.

BULQ is also making the process quicker and easier for buyers. Not only do they offer flat-rate shipping direct to your door, they also offer a manifest guarantee if the contents of the lot is off by more than 2% in terms of condition or quantity.

Continue reading

Bringing Together The World’s Leading Amazon Sellers and Sourcing Experts

Twice a year, the Global Sources Summit hosts the leading speakers on sourcing and private labeling from every corner of the Earth

For Amazon marketplace sellers, private labeling remains one of the most popular business models. This is where sellers source a generic item, create a logo and custom packaging, and then offer it on Amazon under their own brand name and listing.

But the private label model is more difficult than people think, and one of the most difficult aspects is sourcing products from China – especially if sellers have no previous experience of importing. They often make simple but costly errors, like miscommunicating with their supplier or having the wrong export documentation.

This is where the Global Sources Summit comes in. It aims to help established Amazon sellers source more efficiently, by learning from the world’s top sourcing and private label experts. It also gives sellers the opportunity to source products from two co-located trade shows, and to visit Chinese suppliers in person.

Continue reading

Dropshipping: The Essential Guide for Getting Started

Cody Stallard talks all things dropshipping. From deciding what to sell and finding a legitimate supplier, through to processing orders

This post is by Cody Stallard and was originally published as a ten part series on The Wholesale Forums

If you’re looking into selling online, then you will more than likely have come across the term “dropshipping”. Sadly, this isn’t the practice of dropping a ship into the middle of the ocean, however fun that may sound.

No, dropshipping is a business model for online sellers, where merchants don’t purchase their stock until they receive an order. How is this possible? Well, they list an item and then, when an order is placed, they order it from their supplier, who ships it straight to the customer.

Dropshipping is one of the most attractive strategies for selling online, primarily because you never see or touch your stock. This means that you don’t have to find room for hundreds of units, or spend time handling and shipping orders.

In this post, I’ll be looking at the whole dropshipping process, covering everything from from the pros and cons of starting your own dropshipping business, to how the order process works and how to find legitimate suppliers.

Continue reading

My Top Five Tactics for Rapid Product Testing on the Amazon Marketplace

Product selection isn’t about hitting the bullseye first time. It’s about experimentation, data and trying again. Danny McMillan explains his approach.

This post is by Danny McMillan. Danny is an international public speaker, private label seller and host of Seller Sessions the weekly advanced marketing show for Amazon sellers. Danny has been a guest speaker at The Smart China Sourcing Summit in Hong Kong, The European Private Label Summit, The Private Label World Summit and Private Label Days to name a few.

Imagine the situation: you’ve decided to sell a new private label product on Amazon. You find a supplier, agree the details, and place an order with them. You receive the units, create a great listing on Amazon, get some Sponsored Product Ads running… and then the problems start.

Your product just isn’t selling. Maybe your average cost per click is three times what you expected. Maybe your product turns out to be inferior to your competitor’s version. Or maybe there is simply no market for it and the units won’t move whatever you do.

These kind of problems are common, but can often be avoided. If you test the product and the market before committing to a big order, you can discover and fix a lot of problems, and change your approach before taking on stock. This is an organic method, based on testing a number of different factors in your chosen product category. Your results may differ if you are planning on a large scale launch with hundreds of giveaways.

There is a misconception that product testing is costly and time consuming. That doesn’t have to be the case, as you will see in this post. I’ll show you some of my favorite product testing hacks, which will help you generate rich and accurate market data, create better products more quickly, and carry out sample tests to save you a lot of money further down the line.

Continue reading

Wholesalers Won’t Sell to Me. How Can I Win Them Over?

Matthew Ferguson explains why wholesalers are hesitant to deal with marketplace sellers and the best ways to build relationships with them

Have a question for us? Send it to questions@webretailer.com. Readers’ Questions are in partnership with Emanaged and Online Seller Consulting.

Question

I am based in the UK and have been selling on eBay for a couple of years and Amazon for six months. I sell mainly toys and children’s products but I have recently been ungated in the Health and Beauty and Personal Care categories, so I’m looking to spread my wings.

At the moment I mainly do arbitrage but I would really like to move more into wholesale. However, I find that decent wholesalers are reluctant to supply Amazon sellers.

How should I reply to an email from a wholesaler that I have approached, and would really like to work with, to try and ensure I get a favorable response?

— Mandy Williams, U.K.

Continue reading