Monthly Archives: March 2018

Amazon Consultants: How to Choose the Right One for Your Needs

From reviving your sales to reducing your PPC costs, the right Amazon consultant can do it all. But how do you find the one for you?

Why hire a consultant to help with your Amazon sales? The short answer is that selling on Amazon takes a lot of time and technical expertise, and there are people out there who work with Amazon sellers all day, every day, helping them build their businesses.

As interest in Amazon’s marketplace has grown, so has its support ecosystem. There are now plenty of Amazon consultants around, offering support, advice and training. They cover areas from listing optimization and SEO to product compliance and account suspension appeals.

But they aren’t all equal. Some have just a couple of years’ experience with Amazon, while others are veterans with over a decade of knowledge. Some worked for Amazon itself before branching out on their own. Others were successful sellers in their own right, or worked for big companies managing their Amazon marketplace accounts. There are different ways to gain the depth of expertise needed to help others effectively.

In this post, I’ll be looking at what Amazon consultants do, who uses them and how to choose the right type for your businesses needs.

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Direct-to-Consumer Ecommerce: Losers, Winners, and Amazon…

D2C is a huge disruptive force in retail and logistics. Retailers are losing, brands are winning, and Amazon is laughing all the way to the bank.

This post is by Matthew Ferguson, Director of Business Development at ecommerce agency Emanaged and Director of Strategy at consultancy Rich Insight.

Business-to-consumer and business-to-business are old concepts in the retail industry. Stores sell to the final buyers, but themselves need to buy stock from manufacturers, suppliers and distributors. They buy from businesses and they sell to consumers. Historically, it’s always been done this way.

Direct-to-consumer, or D2C, is where brands cut out the middleman and sell their wares straight to the buyer. While this is great for us, as consumers, it’s causing alarm among many retailers and suppliers. If we can order online, why do we need to visit a physical store? If the brand or manufacturer is selling their product directly to us, what role do retailers and distributors have to play?

The last 5 years have been particularly dramatic. Amazon, once a humble online bookstore, has switched on its “beast mode”, causing competitors to adapt, adjust and at times simply freak out. Online marketplaces, led by Amazon, have changed the landscape and broken the conventional flow of products along a long supply chain from manufacturers to consumers.

In contrast to those traditional retailers and distributors, direct-to-consumer is a battle that Amazon just can’t lose. Here’s why D2C has Bezos laughing all the way to the bank.

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Why Do Only 3.9% of U.S. Small Businesses Trade Internationally?

American businesses are failing to embrace cross-border ecommerce, while sellers elsewhere are quick to sell internationally. Why is that?

A recent infographic by international payments company, WorldFirst, asked: “Are American businesses falling short when it comes to cross-border ecommerce?” And, it would seem that the answer was yes, as their infographic found that just 3.9% of small American businesses sell cross-border, compared to 8% of European small businesses.

With the total value of worldwide cross-border ecommerce expected to hit $424 billion dollars by 2021, it seems that small American businesses are missing a trick. Especially, when you consider that 70% of the world’s purchasing power is located outside of the U.S.

So why do so few U.S. small businesses trade internationally? We don’t have the answers – we want to know what you think!

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FedEx and UPS Shipping Contract Negotiations: Your Checklist to Getting Them Done Right

Ten hot tips from Brian Gibbs to make sure you don’t pay sky-high prices, when you sign up or renew your contract with FedEx or UPS

This post is by Brian Gibbs, President of Refund Retriever, a company which audits shippers’ FedEx or UPS accounts for late deliveries and billing mistakes, using their own in-house technology. They also help with contract negotiations, and provide a range of shipping reports to help sellers analyze their activity and get better prices.

What do most small businesses do when their shipping contract comes up for renewal? That’s right, they just resign themselves to rising prices and tougher terms, and sign on the dotted line.

It doesn’t have to be that way. Shipping is a competitive industry, and you can make carriers fight for your business. But how do you do that? FedEx and UPS each have very complicated contracts and it’s hard for online sellers to understand all the variables that exist within those terms.

Here’s how, through contract negotiations, shippers can lower their rates, reduce their shipping spend and improve profitability. There’s no reason for ecommerce merchants and online sellers of any kind to continue overpaying for freight and small parcel shipping.

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Amazon Keyword Tools: Four Software Tools for Keyword Research and Data

Alex Knight gets his golf balls out and walks us through four Amazon keyword research tools, to help sellers optimize their listings and ads



One of an Amazon’s sellers most important jobs is to discover the words that buyers are using to search for their product.

Why? Because they need to make sure that all of the most important terms are included in their Amazon listing. They also need to make sure that their PPC campaigns use relevant terms, with good traffic and sensible competition. Otherwise, they are losing out on potential sales, and wasting money.

So how can sellers find keywords? One way, is to get a thesaurus and sit racking your brains for all the terms that someone could possibly use to find your product. This is going to be a painful experience. You’re almost certainly going to miss words out, and have no useful data on the ones you do find.

Luckily, there is a whole category of software focused on generating keyword suggestions and providing data on their popularity, relevance and competition. I’ve reviewed four of those tools, to help you choose the right ones.

They range from under $10 per month, right through to nearly $400 and there’s also one with a “free forever” plan. The type of data they produce varies, as does the complexity of their interface, with some having Chrome extensions and others just web apps.

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