A Competitor Destroyed My Amazon Selling Account. It Could Happen to Anyone.

An agency hired by my competitors targeted my business with false claims and malicious reviews to bring me down. They almost succeeded.

This post is by Mike Young, an online seller on Amazon and eBay based in London, England. Mike has a background in finance and IT and has investigated financial wrongdoing within the banking industry.

Everyone knows that competition on Amazon is fierce. But I didn’t realize just how fierce until my business lost 50% of its sales in one month, thanks to the black hat tactics of an “online marketing expert” hired by a competitor.

What started with a false claim of trademark infringement turned into policy warnings, a stream of fake negative reviews, and my suspension from selling on Amazon.

In this post, I’ll explain how my business was targeted, what tactics were used, and how I worked out who was behind the attacks.

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eBay is the New Frontier for Private Label Sellers

As private labeling hits saturation point on Amazon, eBay’s new technology is making it attractive for private label sellers and brands

This post is by Anojan Abel, Founder of ShelfTrend, an inventory analytics tool that provides reporting and insight into live shopping activity on the eBay marketplace.

eBay is not traditionally the first venue that sellers think of when looking to develop and launch their own private label brands.

Amazon, however, has attracted hordes of private label sellers, thanks to its strong catalog-based model, effective marketing options, and hands-off order fulfillment using FBA – all features that eBay has lacked.

Now the Amazon marketplace has become a victim of its success, overrun with dozens of me-too listings in popular categories. Competition has become overwhelming, even downright dirty in some cases, and buyers have become wary of low-quality superficial brands.

But major changes are underway at eBay. Slowly but surely the marketplace is casting off its flea-market image and implementing big technology changes, that make it much more attractive to brands and private label sellers. Despite weak growth in recent years, it has retained a huge base of loyal buyers, with a different demographic to the typical Amazon Prime subscriber. Yet developing private label products for eBay is very much in its infancy.

In this post, I’ll explain what has changed at eBay to create this new opportunity for private label sellers and brands, and how businesses can get started early and capture the crucial first-mover advantage.

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Amazon & UPC Codes: All the Answers for Amazon Sellers

Leah McHugh covers all the bases for Amazon sellers and UPC codes: where to buy, brands, private labels, bundles and enforcement practices

UPDATE January 2018: This second edition has been fully reviewed and revised.

This post is by Leah McHugh, an ecommerce consultant for ecommerceChris.com. For Amazon sellers, having their merchant account suspended means losing time and money trying to get back in business. ecommerceChris shows sellers how to keep their accounts healthy, or, if the worst should happen, how to get their account back from a suspension.

In 2016, Amazon quietly made a change to its Product UPC and GTINs policy (Seller Central login required). It now states:

We verify the authenticity of product UPCs by checking the GS1 database. UPCs that do not match the information provided by GS1 will be considered invalid. We recommend obtaining your UPCs directly from GS1 (and not from other third parties selling UPC licenses) to ensure the appropriate information is reflected in the GS1 database.

What does that mean for sellers?

Well, first you need to understand why Amazon has made this change. Amazon has millions of duplicate listings, where someone has slapped their own barcode onto an existing product in the catalog. Duplicate listings are not good for buyer experience. It confuses customers and dilutes product reviews.

The GS1 policy gives Amazon tighter control over what constitutes a valid listing and reduces the chance of duplicate listings. How? Let’s take a look at how barcodes work.

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Is it Still Worth Getting an eBay Store Design and Listing Template?

Changing policies and buyer habits have divided opinion on eBay store designs and listing templates. Which approach is best today?

If you were to jump in a time machine, set the dial back five years and search eBay, it would look quite different. Back then, the marketplace was brimming with vibrantly designed eBay stores and listing templates, because there was little question over the positive impact that a custom design had on sales.

Return to the present day though, and a lot has changed. eBay has banned Active Content and introduced features that hide the listing description, and many more buyers are shopping on mobile phones and tablets.

As a result of these changes, opinion has become polarized on whether having an eBay store design and listing template is good or bad. Some sellers believe that a design can hurt sales and would never use one again, as they are seeing better results with plain text listings.

Other sellers still choose to have a store design, because it provides a recognizable brand, gives marketing opportunities and allows customers to see what makes them unique. It’s one of the big advantages of eBay over Amazon – being able to stand out from the crowd.

In this post I’ll look at the pros and cons of having an eBay store and listing design, and ask if it’s possible to have the best of both worlds: a strongly branded design that works perfectly on desktop and mobile browsers, complies with all of eBay’s policies, and – most importantly of all – increases your overall sales.

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How to Make Amazon’s Customers Your Customers Using Facebook Ads

Anthony Lee explains step-by-step how to use Amazon buyer data to create targeted Facebook ad campaigns, and go direct to customers

This post is by Anthony Lee, COO of SixLeaf (formerly ZonBlast), the first and largest product launch and ranking service for Amazon sellers.

When sellers start offering their own private label products on Amazon, their goal is usually to build an independent brand. They aim to use Amazon as a springboard and, in the future, make most of their sales through their own website.

The problem is that a lot of the training programs and advice available to online sellers doesn’t explain HOW to grow your brand beyond Amazon. There is just a common notion that once your brand becomes “big enough” it will naturally happen. It doesn’t work that way.

In this post, I’m going to talk you through some practical steps which really work to build your brand. You’ll find out how to leverage Amazon buyer data to find your customers on Facebook, and target them with Facebook advertising campaigns.

By doing this, you can direct existing customers, and other buyers just like them, to products on your own webstore, and build a really robust, independent brand.

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