Tag Archives: Branding

Intellectual Property For Amazon Sellers: Know Your Rights!

CJ Rosenbaum explains how to develop your intellectual property rights, protect them and remove hijackers when selling products on Amazon

Intellectual Property For Amazon Sellers: Know Your Rights!

This post is by CJ Rosenbaum, Partner and Managing Attorney at Rosenbaum Famularo, P.C.

At first glance, intellectual property law can seem a frightening subject for online sellers. But, in reality, it’s not as complex as you may think. In fact, there are just two main areas that sellers need to know about – developing and protecting their intellectual property rights.

The development of your intellectual property rights includes creating trademarks, understanding copyright, obtaining patents and designing enforceable trade dress. Once you’ve developed these, protecting your rights simply covers how to spot violations of your intellectual property and what to do about them.

In this article, we’ll cover all the basic information that Amazon sellers need to know about intellectual property law. We’ll look at the ways your listings and products are protected, how to enforce your rights and how to remove listing hijackers.

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5 Ways Amazon Private Label Selling is Under Attack

Private labeling seemed like the perfect business model for the Amazon marketplace. But has the whole private label ethos now had its day?

Private labeling has long been seen as the golden child of business models for Amazon sellers. It allows you to create your own brand and a unique listing, then use some simple marketing methods to push it to success.

For a long time private labelers have had an open playing field to take advantage of the Amazon marketplace. However, a number of changes and challenges are making it increasingly difficult to prosper.

Competition is higher than ever, the market is oversaturated in many product categories, and it is becoming harder than ever to find new products. This has forced prices down and caused profit margins to shrink. Dirty tricks from some sellers are rampant and, overall, the marketplace today is far more aggressive and hostile than it once was.

In this article we discuss the changes which have most affected the Amazon private label business model. So much has changed, is it still possible to succeed as a private label seller?

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How to Use Amazon Brand Registry 2.0 to Protect Your Brand

Here’s what brands need to know about Amazon’s new anti-counterfeiting initiatives: Brand Registry 2.0 and Transparency.

This post is by Leah McHugh, an ecommerce consultant for ecommerceChris.com.

In May of 2017 Amazon released Brand Registry 2.0 to much hype, and rumors around what Brand Registry 2.0 would offer for brand protection.

As with many Amazon changes, there was also a lot of misinformation, leaving many sellers confused or disappointed.

Amazon also quietly opened up their Transparency program in 2017. As early as 2016, they were beta testing this program with select sellers.

The majority of sellers, and more importantly consumers, are still not aware that this program exists, so how can it help protect your brand?

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False Infringement Claims are Rife on Amazon

How unethical sellers abuse the system with bogus IP, trademark, copyright and patent reports: updated with the latest information

This post is by Chris McCabe, a former Investigation Specialist for Amazon’s Seller Performance team, founder of ecommerceChris.com and co-host of the Seller Velocity Conference, taking place in New York City on 26 April.

UPDATE April 2018: This second edition has been fully reviewed and revised.

In order to meet a minimum liability standard, Amazon will act upon properly submitted and completed notice claims of infringement. They will notify specified marketplace sellers which party reported them, on what listing, and how to reach that would-be rights owner via email. The rest though, is up to you. And, unless you (and possibly your legal team) can prove that the Notice claim is false, Amazon considers it valid and actionable.

Unfortunately, word is out among potential Notice claim abusers that anyone can submit a form. Amazon are not worried about additional vetting or verification processes. Investigators merely check the form for completed content in all the right spaces, kill the listings and send off the notifications.

They don’t independently verify that any of the information is actually correct, or valid. The rights owner makes a legally-binding declaration in the form, and signs it. What if you can’t locate a party who submits a false form against you? It’s up to you to chase them down and then show Amazon teams that the infringement allegations are false. There is no guarantee that you’ll be successful though, as results vary.

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Is It Time To Copy Chinese Sellers? Eight Tips For Amazon Sellers

Chad Rubin investigates a Chinese brand that has become one of Amazon’s most successful sellers. How have they achieved so much?

This post is by Chad Rubin, President of ecommerce business Crucial Vacuum, CEO of ecommerce ERP system Skubana, and board member of the PROSPER show for Amazon sellers.

Ever feel like your competition knows more than you?

One minute it’s going so well. You’re at the top of your product page on Amazon, reviews are flowing in and your biggest concern is getting the next batch of orders delivered on time.

But there’s a niggling worry. Little “what ifs” float around your head. What if a cheaper product comes along? What if I lose my supplier? What if the Chinese sellers catch on and start cutting out the middleman entirely?

Well, I’ve got some good news – it doesn’t matter what you’re worried about. Whether it’s low-priced competitors, direct-to-market manufacturers, or sources of new stock drying up.

In this post I’m going to explain why Chinese sellers are dislodging their rivals and dominating Amazon. I’m also going to show you exactly how they boost demand for their products, increase traffic and grow a following.

Sound good? Let’s dig in.

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