Tag Archives: Private Labeling

Is It Time To Copy Chinese Sellers? Eight Tips For Amazon Sellers

Chad Rubin investigates a Chinese brand that has become one of Amazon’s most successful sellers. How have they achieved so much?

This post is by Chad Rubin, President of ecommerce business Crucial Vacuum, CEO of ecommerce ERP system Skubana, and board member of the PROSPER show for Amazon sellers.

Ever feel like your competition knows more than you?

One minute it’s going so well. You’re at the top of your product page on Amazon, reviews are flowing in and your biggest concern is getting the next batch of orders delivered on time.

But there’s a niggling worry. Little “what ifs” float around your head. What if a cheaper product comes along? What if I lose my supplier? What if the Chinese sellers catch on and start cutting out the middleman entirely?

Well, I’ve got some good news – it doesn’t matter what you’re worried about. Whether it’s low-priced competitors, direct-to-market manufacturers, or sources of new stock drying up.

In this post I’m going to explain why Chinese sellers are dislodging their rivals and dominating Amazon. I’m also going to show you exactly how they boost demand for their products, increase traffic and grow a following.

Sound good? Let’s dig in.

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eBay is the New Frontier for Private Label Sellers

As private labeling hits saturation point on Amazon, eBay’s new technology is making it attractive for private label sellers and brands

This post is by Anojan Abel, Founder of ShelfTrend, an inventory analytics tool that provides reporting and insight into live shopping activity on the eBay marketplace.

eBay is not traditionally the first venue that sellers think of when looking to develop and launch their own private label brands.

Amazon, however, has attracted hordes of private label sellers, thanks to its strong catalog-based model, effective marketing options, and hands-off order fulfillment using FBA – all features that eBay has lacked.

Now the Amazon marketplace has become a victim of its success, overrun with dozens of me-too listings in popular categories. Competition has become overwhelming, even downright dirty in some cases, and buyers have become wary of low-quality superficial brands.

But major changes are underway at eBay. Slowly but surely the marketplace is casting off its flea-market image and implementing big technology changes, that make it much more attractive to brands and private label sellers. Despite weak growth in recent years, it has retained a huge base of loyal buyers, with a different demographic to the typical Amazon Prime subscriber. Yet developing private label products for eBay is very much in its infancy.

In this post, I’ll explain what has changed at eBay to create this new opportunity for private label sellers and brands, and how businesses can get started early and capture the crucial first-mover advantage.

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CE Marking for Private Labels and Brands: How to Get Compliant

Fredrik Gronkvist explains what CE marking is, which products are covered, how to make your products compliant and how much it costs

This post is by Fredrik Gronkvist, the co-founder of Chinaimportal.com, in Hong Kong. They provide free online courses for importers who want to learn more about manufacturing in Asia, product regulations and shipping.

What is CE marking? What kind of products need CE marking? And who is actually responsible for making sure the product gets CE marked?

These are questions I see in my inbox on a daily basis.

CE marking is misunderstood, but not necessarily as complicated as you might think.

In this article, I will explain what every importer and online seller must know about CE marking, what it takes to make a product compliant and how much it’ll cost you.

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Private Label Pricing: Advice From Three Leading Amazon Experts

Will Tjernlund, Greg Mercer and Bernie Thompson talk about private label pricing, from costs and competitors to products and positioning

There is a common misconception about private labeling on Amazon that simply taking a generic product and slapping a logo on it is a recipe for success. In most cases, there are other factors that play a key part.

One of these is price. Unlike wholesale or reselling models, where a manufacturer will often provide you with a retail price, and there are usually many competitors selling the same product, there are no such guidelines with private labeling – the price is totally down to you.

This can be daunting, as not only do you have to analyze market pricing, and decide on your initial place within it, but you also need a strategy for altering your price to react to market changes and your competitors.

To shed some light on this topic, I spoke to three private label experts – Will Tjernlund, Greg Mercer and Bernie Thompson – to get their advice on how to price private label products.
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My Top Five Tactics for Rapid Product Testing on the Amazon Marketplace

Product selection isn’t about hitting the bullseye first time. It’s about experimentation, data and trying again. Danny McMillan explains his approach.

This post is by Danny McMillan. Danny is an international public speaker, private label seller and host of Seller Sessions the weekly advanced marketing show for Amazon sellers. Danny has been a guest speaker at The Smart China Sourcing Summit in Hong Kong, The European Private Label Summit, The Private Label World Summit and Private Label Days to name a few.

Imagine the situation: you’ve decided to sell a new private label product on Amazon. You find a supplier, agree the details, and place an order with them. You receive the units, create a great listing on Amazon, get some Sponsored Product Ads running… and then the problems start.

Your product just isn’t selling. Maybe your average cost per click is three times what you expected. Maybe your product turns out to be inferior to your competitor’s version. Or maybe there is simply no market for it and the units won’t move whatever you do.

These kind of problems are common, but can often be avoided. If you test the product and the market before committing to a big order, you can discover and fix a lot of problems, and change your approach before taking on stock. This is an organic method, based on testing a number of different factors in your chosen product category. Your results may differ if you are planning on a large scale launch with hundreds of giveaways.

There is a misconception that product testing is costly and time consuming. That doesn’t have to be the case, as you will see in this post. I’ll show you some of my favorite product testing hacks, which will help you generate rich and accurate market data, create better products more quickly, and carry out sample tests to save you a lot of money further down the line.

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