Get Sourcing This April at Global Sources Exhibitions

From mobile devices to virtual reality, home products, fashion and luggage, you can source almost anything at Global Sources trade shows

If you are a private labeler or a seller looking to develop a brand, it’s very likely that you’ll be sourcing products from factories in Asia. So it makes a lot of sense to attend trade shows there, and meet face-to-face with potential suppliers.

Not only does this cut out lengthy email conversations, where your requirements can be easily misunderstood, it helps you get a feel for the right supplier and start building a relationship with them.

Trade shows also give sellers a chance to get hands on with potential products. In the age of the internet sellers can be all too tempted to source products without ever seeing them. At trade shows, sellers can get their hands on sample products, test them out and make a far more informed decision on which products to source.

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All the Software and Services You Need

Web Retailer has the world's leading directory of software tools and service providers for online sellers.

We focus on online marketplaces such as Amazon and eBay.

Expanding to new marketplaces?

see Multichannel Management

Selling across borders?

see International Ecommerce

Making delivery more efficient?

see Shipping & Fulfillment

Automating your pricing?

see Pricing & Repricing

Researching products to sell?

see Product Sourcing

Working on your reputation?

see Feedback, Reviews & Support

Looking for outside help?

see Outsourcing & Consultants

Improving your finances?

see Financial Management

Starting to sell independently?

see Online Stores & Social Media

There are also dedicated categories for the leading marketplaces Amazon and eBay, and we cover all online marketplaces worldwide including Etsy,, Walmart, Mercado Libre, Tesco, Cdiscount and many more.

Try our Advanced Search to find software compatible with a specific marketplace or shopping cart, or that are integrated with tools you already use.

Browse our Buying Guides for detailed information, in plain English, about all our categories and how to choose the right software or services for your needs.

Browse the Directory

Direct-to-Consumer Ecommerce: Losers, Winners, and Amazon…

D2C is a huge disruptive force in retail and logistics. Retailers are losing, brands are winning, and Amazon is laughing all the way to the bank.

This post is by Matthew Ferguson, Director of Business Development at ecommerce agency Emanaged and Director of Strategy at consultancy Rich Insight.

Business-to-consumer and business-to-business are old concepts in the retail industry. Stores sell to the final buyers, but themselves need to buy stock from manufacturers, suppliers and distributors. They buy from businesses and they sell to consumers. Historically, it’s always been done this way.

Direct-to-consumer, or D2C, is where brands cut out the middleman and sell their wares straight to the buyer. While this is great for us, as consumers, it’s causing alarm among many retailers and suppliers. If we can order online, why do we need to visit a physical store? If the brand or manufacturer is selling their product directly to us, what role do retailers and distributors have to play?

The last 5 years have been particularly dramatic. Amazon, once a humble online bookstore, has switched on its “beast mode”, causing competitors to adapt, adjust and at times simply freak out. Online marketplaces, led by Amazon, have changed the landscape and broken the conventional flow of products along a long supply chain from manufacturers to consumers.

In contrast to those traditional retailers and distributors, direct-to-consumer is a battle that Amazon just can’t lose. Here’s why D2C has Bezos laughing all the way to the bank.

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Why Do Only 3.9% of U.S. Small Businesses Trade Internationally?

American businesses are failing to embrace cross-border ecommerce, while sellers elsewhere are quick to sell internationally. Why is that?

A recent infographic by international payments company, WorldFirst, asked: “Are American businesses falling short when it comes to cross-border ecommerce?” And, it would seem that the answer was yes, as their infographic found that just 3.9% of small American businesses sell cross-border, compared to 8% of European small businesses.

With the total value of worldwide cross-border ecommerce expected to hit $424 billion dollars by 2021, it seems that small American businesses are missing a trick. Especially, when you consider that 70% of the world’s purchasing power is located outside of the U.S.

So why do so few U.S. small businesses trade internationally? We don’t have the answers – we want to know what you think!

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